Family & Emergency Dentist in Kanata - Centrum Dental Centre

Welcome to Centrum Dental Centre, an established dental office in Kanata that has been located in the Centrum Plaza for over 20 years. We are the "Helpful Dental Office". If you are looking for a dentist in Kanata, for your family and implant dentistry needs, you have come to the right place!

Dr. Yamen Ghamian, Dr. Habib Khoury, Dr. Alan Tang and their team are here to help you find your best smile.  You can count on us to make your dental appointments more pleasant than any you have ever experienced.  We strive to provide the very best comprehensive dental care for you and your family, in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere where we listen to your oral health goals and help you achieve them.

We are YOUR Dentists in Kanata!


Centrum Dental Centre

Why Choose Us?

We take the time to get to know you, to listen to your needs and come up with solutions that meet your long term goals in a cozy and home style environment. We offer state-of-the-art dentistry with exceptional quality of care.

 

We provide the following for your comfort: 

High-Tech, Soft Touch dental careDentist in Kanata
Early mornings, evening & Saturday appointments
Sedation options for our anxious patients
All aspects of general and cosmetic dentistry
Diagnostic lasers and digital x-rays
Dental implant placement and restoration
• Snoring & sleep apnea treatments
• Orthodontics and Invisible braces
• Aromatherapy and noise cancelling headphones
TV's in every room & relaxing music
Emergency dental care
Dental claims electronically submitted to insurance
Payments accepted via cash, debit and credit cards
• Wheelchair accessible

 

Centrum Dental Vision
 

Our team works together to give our best to our patients. We create an environment of trust and professionalism where patients feel listened to, cared for and welcome. We love what we do and we do it with a smile! 

We are your dentist in Kanata. 

Our Purpose

Who are ‘We’?

We are a supportive team who share a common purpose, to which we are all committed. We are empowered to set goals, solve problems and make decisions in terms of dentistry. Our common purpose is to give our personal best at what we do and to do it with a positive and friendly attitude. 

 

What do ‘We’ do? 

We provide individualized care to our patients as though they are part of our family. We do so with honesty, professionalism, and a commitment to always improve our knowledge and skill sets. 


Whom ‘We’ do it for?

We provide care to those who see oral care as an integral part of their overall health. Our patients want honest professional advice from their dentist, to know their options and to be involved in the decision making process.


 

 

 

 

 

Archive for October 2016

As today is Halloween, this is a good time to talk about "Nutrition and Your Teeth"
 

It has long been known that good nutrition and a well-balanced diet is one of the best defenses for your oral health. Providing your body with the right amounts of vitamins and minerals helps your teeth and gums-as well as your immune system-stay strong and ward off infection, decay and disease.

Harmful acids and bacteria in your mouth are left behind from eating foods high in sugar and carbohydrates. These include carbonated beverages, some kinds of fruit juices, and many kinds of starch foods like pasta, bread and cereal.

Children's Nutrition and Teeth

Good eating habits that begin in early childhood can go a long way to ensuring a lifetime of good oral health.

Children should eat foods rich in calcium and other kinds of minerals, as well as a healthy balance of the essential food groups like vegetables, fruits, dairy products, poultry and meat. Fluoride supplements may be helpful if you live in a community without fluoridated water, but consult with our office first. (Be aware that sugars are even found in some kinds of condiments, as well as fruits and even milk.)

Allowing your children to eat excessive amounts of junk food (starches and sugars)-including potato chips, cookies, crackers, soda, even artificial fruit rollups and granola bars-only places them at risk for serious oral health problems, including obesity, osteoporosis and diabetes. The carbonation found in soda, for example, can actually erode tooth enamel. Encourage your child to use a straw when drinking soda; this will help keep at least some of the carbonated beverage away from the teeth.


Smart Snacks for Healthy Teeth
There's no discounting the importance of continuing a healthy balanced diet throughout your adult life.

What's wrong with sugary snacks, anyway?
Sugary snacks taste so good — but they aren't so good for your teeth or your body. The candies, cakes, cookies and other sugary foods that kids love to eat between meals can cause tooth decay. Some sugary foods have a lot of fat in them, too. Kids who consume sugary snacks eat many  different kinds of sugar every day, including table sugar (sucrose) and corn sweeteners (fructose). Starchy snacks can also break down into sugars once they're in your mouth.

How do sugars attack your teeth?
Invisible germs called bacteria live in your mouth all the time. Some of these bacteria form a sticky material called plaque on the surface of the teeth. When you put sugar in your mouth, the bacteria in the plaque gobble up the sweet stuff and turn it into acids. These acids are powerful enough to dissolve the hard enamel that covers your teeth. That's how cavities get started. If you don't eat much sugar, the bacteria can't produce as much of the acid that eats away enamel.

How can I "snack smart" to protect myself from tooth decay?
Before you start munching on a snack, ask yourself what's in the food you've chosen. Is it loaded with sugar? If it is, think again. Another choice would be better for your teeth. And keep in mind that certain kinds of sweets can do more damage than others. Gooey or chewy sweets spend more time sticking to the surface of your teeth. Because sticky snacks stay in your mouth longer than foods that you quickly chew and swallow, they give your teeth a longer sugar bath. You should also think about when and how often you eat snacks. Do you nibble on sugary snacks many times throughout the day, or do you usually just have dessert after dinner? Damaging acids form in your mouth every time you eat a sugary snack. The acids continue to affect your teeth for at least 20 minutes before they are neutralized and can't do any more harm. So, the more times you eat sugary snacks during the day, the more often you feed bacteria the fuel they need to cause tooth decay.

If you eat sweets, it's best to eat them as dessert after a main meal instead of several times a day between meals. Whenever you eat sweets — in any meal or snack — brush your teeth well with a fluoride toothpaste afterward.

When you're deciding about snacks, think about:
•    The number of times a day you eat sugary snacks
•    How long the sugary food stays in your mouth
•    The texture of the sugary food (Chewy? Sticky?)
If you snack after school, before bedtime, or other times during the day, choose something without a lot of sugar or fat. There are lots of tasty, filling snacks that are less harmful to your teeth—and the rest of your body — than foods loaded with sugars and low in nutritional value. Snack smart!

Low-fat choices like raw vegetables, fresh fruits, or whole-grain crackers or bread are smart choices. Eating the right foods can help protect you from tooth decay and other diseases. Next time you reach for a snack, pick a food from the list inside or make up your own menu of non-sugary, low-fat snack foods from the basic food groups.

How can you snack smart? Be choosy!
Pick a variety of foods from these groups:

Fresh fruits and raw vegetables
Berries
Oranges
Grapefruit
Melons
Pineapple
Pears
Tangerines
Broccoli
Celery
Carrots
Cucumbers
Tomatoes
Unsweetened fruit and vegetable juices
Canned fruits in natural juices

Grains
Bread
Plain bagels
Unsweetened cereals
Unbuttered popcorn
Tortilla chips (baked, not fried)
Pretzels (low-salt)
Pasta
Plain crackers

Milk and dairy products
Low or non-fat milk
Low or non-fat yogurt
Low or non-fat cheese
Low or non-fat cottage cheese

Meat, nuts and seeds
Chicken
Turkey
Sliced meats
Pumpkin seeds
Sunflower seeds
Nuts

Others
(these snacks combine foods from the different groups)
Pizza
Tacos

Remember to:
•    Choose sugary foods less often
•    Avoid sweets between meals
•    Eat a variety of low or non-fat foods from the basic groups
•    Brush your teeth with fluoride toothpaste after snacks and meals

Note to parents
The foods listed in this leaflet have not all been tested for their decay-causing potential. However, knowledge to date indicates that they are less likely to promote tooth decay than are some of the heavily sugared foods children often eat between meals.
Candy bars aren't the only culprits. Foods such as pizza, breads, and hamburger buns may also contain sugars. Check the label. The new food labels identify sugars and fats on the Nutrition Facts panel on the package. Keep in mind that brown sugar, honey, molasses and syrups also react with bacteria to produce acids, just as refined table sugar does. These foods also are potentially damaging to teeth.

Your child's meals and snacks should include a variety of foods from the basic food groups, including fruits and vegetables; grains, including breads and cereals; milk and dairy products; and meat, nuts and seeds. Some snack foods have greater nutritional value than others and will better promote your child's growth and development. However, be aware that even some fresh fruits, if eaten in excess, may promote tooth decay. Children should brush their teeth with fluoride toothpaste after snacks and meals. (So should you!)


Please note: These general recommendations may need to be adapted for children on special diets because of diseases or conditions that interfere with normal nutrition.